A Travellerspoint blog

Meeting people and saying goodbye

By Kt

We've not been travelling long but already I realise the nature of meeting people is very intensive and very short.
Tuvununu, being a small hostel, means you are all in close proximity and eat dinner and  often breakfast together. So, you tend to gravitate to the people you click best with. The differences in types of personalities, nationalities and ages is interesting to observe. 
We've had a mixed bag, of mainly nice people here over the last few days and over Xmas.
Firstly, the young'ns. All in their very early 20s or late teens.
We have the Danish guy who was  nice, if a little bullish but who had an incredibly offensive Tshirt (we're talking the 'c' word here) was bad enough but he didn't take it off when the carol singers were here - that cannot be forgiven frankly. 
Becky 1 from Sevenoaks didn't speak to much, but was down to earth and sharp witted (in a good way). 
Becky 2 from Canada - funny, lively, sang and played guitar and had a not so subtle crush on one of the Fijian guys.
Alex from northern England, a sweet, slightly gangly lad with a good, dry wit.
Joey from Chicago (by way of DC and St Lois), a funny, charming lad with a sparkling white smile and always with something to say, unless hungover.
Megan from Hereford, a sweet, slightly kooky girl with a warm and fuzzy personality.
Karen from Brittany, older, probably in her 40s and works on a scientific ship in between Samoa and Tahiti who we will meet again at our next destination which will be nice.
Then finally, Australian Todd. Well what can I say about Todd? In his early 30s, I would say. A carpenter, who has apparently being travelling for 9 years (no-one believes him). He was, for want of a better description, a bit mental. I'd clocked some of the odd convos he'd been having with the group of young'n (they'd all been on the island macgai together so knew each other), so I had realised that giving him a wide birth was probably a good idea. Not so Mark, after a couple of beers, who thought it was a good idea to befriend him and then to try to help him with his issues. I tried to get him out if it, early on, but he was oblivious to what lay ahead. So Mark spent HOURS listening to Todd harp on and on about his abandonment issues. He'd been adopted and was in the orphanage for a month before he was adopted. Some would think him lucky to have a new home so quickly - but oh no, not Todd. Apparently this month, at a crucial stage of his development, has shaped his life ever since and no-one could possibly understand what he had gone through. Mark tried to make a few useful suggestions, along the lines, of moving on, but realised that this really was a one way conversation and perhaps ge wasn't the first to have been subjected to this diatribe (apparently, mild mannered Alex had been driven so mad he ended up shouting at him to shut up about it).
Luckily, after a few hours, Mark escaped and Todd went onto to harrass Mark, who runs the place and some of the Fijian guys over the cava bowl (which he then apparently threw up next to, later still. I could tell you so much more about Todd, but I will spare you. He went yesterday luckily, but he has bought up another dilemma of travelling. It is a small travelling world and you're very likely to meet people again that you've met along the way. This is of course, welcome, in most cases, but Todd has highlighted the downside of this. All of us are terrified of ending up at the same hostel as him during our remaining time in Fiji. It is, of course, funny though, if it happens to someone else and not us ;)

So, today, the last 2 (our favourite 2, Joey and Meg) left and Mark and I are the only guests at Tuvununu. It feels a bit odd. It has made me realise it's going to be like this a lot and worse. Bitter sweet. 

Posted by KtandMark 00:04 Archived in Fiji

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